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September 11, 2005

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» Lean manufacturing is resiliency from Fashion-Incubator
I've been working with DEs (designer-entrepreneurs) for nearly 15 years now. Through out that time, I have been gratified -but usually dismayed- by how DEs typically manage growth and success. As long as they're operating at a low level, many... [Read More]

» Lean manufacturing is resiliency from Fashion-Incubator
I've been working with DEs (designer-entrepreneurs) for nearly 15 years now. Through out that time, I have been gratified -but usually dismayed- by how DEs typically manage growth and success. As long as they're operating at a low level, many... [Read More]

» Lean manufacturing is resiliency from Fashion-Incubator
I've been working with DEs (designer-entrepreneurs) for nearly 15 years now. Through out that time, I have been gratified -but usually dismayed- by how DEs typically manage growth and success. As long as they're operating at a low level, many... [Read More]

Comments

Jim Hanna

John,
Thanks for the link. In the context of this date and time, I can't think of a more appropriate topic to bring to the attention of the country. By now it should be apparent to even the less attentive among us that being "the most powerful nation in the world" does not protect us from the consequences of decisions based on ignorance and ideology.

Charles Cameron

QUOTE: Yossi's view is that resilient companies have a corporate culture that pushes decision making to the periphery. .... This culture of responsibility runs from the top to the bottom. "People in resilient organizations know that when disruption is evident there is no time to go through the bureaucratic processes."

QUESTION: Where do I find the clearest, pithy-est, most authoritative statement of the need for this kind of distributed decision-making in the military, John?

JTH

John:

Even in the Military - those who work fast (Special Forces) are held in suspection by the "Regular Forces" ... slow and steady.
Right?

But I'm pleased with the interviews with Honore on Sunday talk shows ... seems he's getting something done.

Bulldozers aren't as fast as ATV's but move a hell of a lot more.

David Brooks, today's NYTimes OpEd:

"...the brutal fact is, government tends toward bureaucracy, which means elaborate paper flow but ineffective action. Government depends on planning, but planners can never really anticipate the inevitable complexity of events. And American government is inevitably divided and power is inevitably devolved.

For example, the Army Corps of Engineers had plenty of money (Louisiana received more than any other state), but that spending was carved up into little pork barrel projects. There were ample troops nearby to maintain order, but they were divided between federal and state authorities and constrained by regulations.

This preparedness plan is government as it really is. It reminds us that canning Michael Brown or appointing some tough response czar will not change the endemic failures at the heart of this institutional collapse.

So of course we need limited but energetic government. But liberals who think this disaster is going to set off a progressive revival need to explain how a comprehensive governmental failure is going to restore America's faith in big government."

Stomaphagus

["...]So of course we need limited but energetic government. But liberals who think this disaster is going to set off a progressive revival need to explain how a comprehensive governmental failure is going to restore America's faith in big government."

I'm not sure where Brooks gets his "plenty of money" theory about the Corps. When funds for a specific project get reallocated, that project doesn't have "plenty" though the org as a whole may be rolling in it. And so what if LA had the biggest cut of the pie? Was it big enough? What we've seen over the last few weeks is not big government but neglected government -- or at the very least government with poor priorities.

(Even a horse requires a certain amount of food and care to remain a reliable source of work. If you cut back on the food and care, the horse stops performing as well. The correct response then is not to distrust the horse -- feed the poor thing!)

Jim

How does JIT & SCM fit into an organization such as the Department of Defense

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